The Athenaeum http://theath.ca Acadia University's Student Newspaper Since 1874 Wed, 19 Sep 2018 23:38:19 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 http://theath.ca/app/uploads/2017/07/cropped-LOGO-1-50x50.png The Athenaeum http://theath.ca 32 32 Equity Officer: Ruvimbo Chipazi http://theath.ca/news/equity-officer-ruvimbo-chipazi/ http://theath.ca/news/equity-officer-ruvimbo-chipazi/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:55:51 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4440 My name is Ruvimbo Z. Chipazi. I am a 3rd year psychology student and I enjoy reading stories, I love hearing about people’s stories. During my time at Acadia, I have only scratched the surface of the diverse stories that our campus has to offer. I want to be in a position that allows me... Read more »

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My name is Ruvimbo Z. Chipazi. I am a 3rd year psychology student and I enjoy reading stories, I love hearing about people’s stories. During my time at Acadia, I have only scratched the surface of the diverse stories that our campus has to offer. I want to be in a position that allows me to listen and understand Acadia student stories. More people need to know, see and understand just how diverse our community is. I don’t just want black and white stories. I want diverse stories of age, national origin, religion, differently abled, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation and language – just to name a few. Acadia needs diversity in ideas, perspectives and values. I want to help bring about that diversity. Everyone’s story is important. I’m here to listen and make sure these stories are heard.

You Talk. I Listen. We Act.

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Equity Officer: Kate Hamre http://theath.ca/news/equity-officer-kate-hamre/ http://theath.ca/news/equity-officer-kate-hamre/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:50:19 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4438 My name is Kate Hamre and I am a third-year Kinesiology student from Fredericton, New Brunswick. You might have seen me on campus, around Wolfville or know me through the various societies’ and volunteering programs I have been involved with during my time at Acadia such as: S.M.I.L.E, Kinderskills, ASK, Acadia Ambassadors and the House... Read more »

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My name is Kate Hamre and I am a third-year Kinesiology student from Fredericton, New Brunswick. You might have seen me on campus, around Wolfville or know me through the various societies’ and volunteering programs I have been involved with during my time at Acadia such as: S.M.I.L.E, Kinderskills, ASK, Acadia Ambassadors and the House Council Executive. Now I want to take my involvement in Acadia’s community a step further by running to be your Equity Officer for the 2018-2019 academic year. I recognize the increasing diversity on our campus and wish to ensure that the Acadia Students’ Union is conscious, and accommodating to the students’ needs regarding equity and accessibility. If I am elected, I want to create a community where everyone can succeed, where individuals are not bound but celebrated by the things that make them unique and a community where everyone has a voice that is heard.

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First Year Officer: Hunter Murchison-Doggart http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-hunter-murchison-doggart/ http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-hunter-murchison-doggart/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:49:19 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4436 My name is Hunter Murchison-Doggart, and I am a first year Politics major. I am extremely excited to be running for your 2018/2019 First Year Officer. I come from a town just outside of Toronto, where there are great schools. But I felt that I needed to go somewhere that would feel more like a... Read more »

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My name is Hunter Murchison-Doggart, and I am a first year Politics major. I am extremely excited to be running for your 2018/2019 First Year Officer. I come from a town just outside of Toronto, where there are great schools. But I felt that I needed to go somewhere that would feel more like a family. I feel that I can bring a lot of ideas to help make sure that you first years, just like me have a great experience at Acadia. If I am elected First Year Officer, I hope to bring an experience to students, especially first year students like no other school. I wanna hear the student’s ideas on what they would like to see happen. With past experiences, I loved when I planned Relay for Life for my high school. It was a great opportunity I wish to share with everyone here, and much more.

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First Year Officer: Blake Steeves http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-blake-steeves/ http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-blake-steeves/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:48:13 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4434 Blake is a first year business student living in Barrax house. Blake has perfected his now world-renowned dancing skills. In his free time, Blake enjoys performing his DJ skills, playing hockey and rocking his cowboy boots through the beautiful streets of Wolfville. Blake is running for the position of Acadia’s Student Union’s First Year Officer.... Read more »

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Blake is a first year business student living in Barrax house. Blake has perfected his now world-renowned dancing skills. In his free time, Blake enjoys performing his DJ skills, playing hockey and rocking his cowboy boots through the beautiful streets of Wolfville. Blake is running for the position of Acadia’s Student Union’s First Year Officer. He is very ambitious for the upcoming year and would love to put his mark on Acadia. As First Year Officer, he will be relentless in pursuing his ambitions. He will be the voice of Acadia’s first year population. Aiming to improve communication and student life, Blake will serve as a relations member and be sitting on councils to make your freshman year the best year here at Acadia. Blake Steeves is your best option for First Year Officer. Come out on September 27th and make the right choice. Vote Blake Steeves.

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First Year Officer: Chantal Peng http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-chantal-peng/ http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-chantal-peng/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:46:33 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4430 Chantal Peng is a Bachelor of Music student majoring in Piano Performance who will not only listen to ideas and concerns, but also will voice and address any of your needs to ASU, the local community, and abroad. Having served many positions on various committees, currently including Kings Municipal Youth Council and as a Plan... Read more »

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Chantal Peng is a Bachelor of Music student majoring in Piano Performance who will not only listen to ideas and concerns, but also will voice and address any of your needs to ASU, the local community, and abroad. Having served many positions on various committees, currently including Kings Municipal Youth Council and as a Plan International Canada Gender Equality Youth Advocate, Chantal always strives to be a platform for encouraging involvement within the university community. An internationally acclaimed musician, she has performed for Justin Trudeau, and was featured on CBC Radio One speaking about involvement in Nova Scotia’s music scene. Past involvement in high-school Student Government and as NS ACT 4 Global Change Ambassador, Chantal understands that transparent, effective communication begins with creating unbiased, open dialogues. Hailing from Wolfville, NS, she has grown up immersed in the creative community that Acadia students continue to build. Vote #Chantal4FirstYear.

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First Year Officer: Kristi Stewart http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-kristi-stewart/ http://theath.ca/news/first-year-officer-kristi-stewart/#respond Wed, 19 Sep 2018 16:45:39 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4422 My name is Kristi Stewart, I am a first-year student majoring in Political Science, born and raised in Prince Edward Island. Growing up in such a small province with a population of 146,000 people, I am very familiar with the lifestyle of living in such a concentrated town such as Wolfville. Due to this, being... Read more »

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My name is Kristi Stewart, I am a first-year student majoring in Political Science, born and raised in Prince Edward Island. Growing up in such a small province with a population of 146,000 people, I am very familiar with the lifestyle of living in such a concentrated town such as Wolfville. Due to this, being involved in my community has always been a top priority for me, from volunteering to working for the PEI Legislature. I am constantly advocating for our voices to be heard. I plan to continue this passion of mine and share it with students here at Acadia. I hope with this election the students of Acadia University will allow me to grow with them, I have many great ideas and am excited to explore the interests of our University! Vote for experience; a voice for first-year students. Vote me, Kristi Stewart as your First Year Officer.

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Controversial Professor Dismissed from University http://theath.ca/news/controversial-professor-dismissed-university/ http://theath.ca/news/controversial-professor-dismissed-university/#respond Sat, 08 Sep 2018 12:15:19 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4403 Controversial professor Dr. Rick Mehta has been dismissed from Acadia University. The Acadia University Faculty Association (AUFA) noted in a statement that they were notified of Dr. Mehta’s dismissal by the university on August 31st. AUFA’s statement noted that “termination of a tenured professor is very serious, and AUFA has filed for arbitration while its... Read more »

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Controversial professor Dr. Rick Mehta has been dismissed from Acadia University. The Acadia University Faculty Association (AUFA) noted in a statement that they were notified of Dr. Mehta’s dismissal by the university on August 31st.

AUFA’s statement noted that “termination of a tenured professor is very serious, and AUFA has filed for arbitration while its Senior Grievance Officer and legal counsel examine the Administration’s disciplinary procedures and evidence.”

Under Article 14 of the 15th Collective Agreement ratified in early 2018, if an employee of AUFA  fails to conduct themselves according to duties laid out in Article 15 then they are subject to a meeting with the Dean and faculty head. If the issue is not resolved the Dean undergoes an investigation and if just cause is found, submits a report to the Vice President Academic of the university.

Scott Roberts, Executive Director of Communications for the university, confirmed Dr. Mehta’s dismissal but noted that because it was a personnel issue he could not offer further comment.

George Philp, ASU President, noted that “as this is a human resources matter involving the University the ASU is not issuing any comment” and directed further media inquiries to Scott Roberts.

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OPINION: I believe in Nova Scotia. You should too. http://theath.ca/opinions/believe-nova-scotia/ http://theath.ca/opinions/believe-nova-scotia/#respond Thu, 12 Apr 2018 18:45:07 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4208 This article was published in Issue 79.1 of The Athenaeum. Several months ago, I met a guy. Initially, I didn’t think it was worth my time to talk to him, but at the insistence of a good friend I sat down and chatted with this guy about his work. For the past year he had... Read more »

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This article was published in Issue 79.1 of The Athenaeum.

Several months ago, I met a guy. Initially, I didn’t think it was worth my time to talk to him, but at the insistence of a good friend I sat down and chatted with this guy about his work. For the past year he had dedicated much of his life to We are NS, a Facebook and Instagram page he had started to showcase what Nova Scotia was really about. When we talked he spoke with such passion and ferocity that he could have been there for hours.

But it was one sentence that truly grabbed me. He told me how “the landscape of Nova Scotia inspired creativity”.

That got me thinking.

As one of the founding provinces of Confederation, Nova Scotia has always played a smaller but important role in Canada. From a mighty shipbuilding and fishing economy to booming natural resources, Nova Scotia has had a front row seat to the changing demands of the global market. The ups and downs of the global economy are as unpredictable as the weather, but their effects can be equally destructive. Atlantic Canada has been hit particularly hard by the latest series of slumps and outmigration is at an all-time high, depriving the province of $1.2 billion annually, but this is not a cause for despair.

This is a wakeup call. Like Madonna or David Bowie, this province has the opportunity to reinvent itself in a big way.

Let me first profess that I am by no means an economics expert nor a native Nova Scotian. The latter aside, I have fallen in love with this province. It’s impossible for me not to smile when I walk through Wolfville in the fall and see the beautiful colours, or hike Cape Split and feel the cool wind, or sip on a glass of Luckett wine as the sun sets in front of me. I can’t get enough of this province because it exudes beauty.

Currently the province is between a rock and a hard place. Outmigration deprives the province of nearly 1300 people between the age of 20-29 every year. Why? Most of you know the answer. They don’t see a reason to stay.

According to an article in The Chronicle Herald “eliminating net migration over the past 10 years could have generated over half a billion dollars in additional provincial revenue”. Even recent university graduates could have contributed over a billion dollars to the provincial economy, had they chosen to stay.

The opportunities are here. There is more than ample room to expand our horizons and bring Nova Scotia to North American and global prominence. In today’s world we cannot content ourselves with being a small hideaway on the Atlantic. We have to assert ourselves and push to new heights with new ways of thinking.

I turn now to California. The Golden State is considered the gem of the American economy, with a GDP the size of Spain. Needless to say it’s a big state. The higher education institutions of the region, specifically Stanford University, pushed the state to the cusp of an economic boom in the mid 1970s.

Frederick Terman, son of distinguished psychologist Lewis Terman, saw how at MIT the faculty actively researched and maintained contact with industry through constant interaction and putting students in corporations through co-ops or internships. He brought these ideas to Stanford while serving as Dean of the university from 1955-1965 and helped sow the seeds for the birth of Silicon Valley.

It was this contact between universities, corporations, and government that allowed for the prospering of Silicon Valley. Each recognized the importance of one another in achieving its ultimate ends. Universities wanted more money to do things with, so they invested by putting students in corporations through co-ops and internships. Corporations wanted more workers and to churn more profits, so they brought in more and more students to solidify their workforce. The government wanted to grow its economy and achieve a higher standard of living, so it invested more into universities to enroll students. The cycle comes full circle.

Nova Scotia is the province best suited for this to happen. The release of the Ivany Report in 2014 provided the impetus for change. The province has 10 universities and NSCC, which has 13 campuses, all for a population of less than a million people.  That only reinforces how ripe for growth our province is.

We’re already going in the right direction. Universities across the province are building off their strengths. Acadia has the Centre for Rural Innovation, the Atlantic Wine Institute, the Tidal Energy Institute, and the Institute for Data Analytics, in addition to Launchbox, providing funds for student-entrepreneurs. Dalhousie is responsible for 98% of all industry sponsored research in the province, working with companies like BlueLight Analytics and Atlantic Motor Labs to strengthen its ties to marine biology and ocean science sectors. Cape Breton University has the Uhma Institute of Technology (UIT) Startup Immersion Program, which teaches students for six months regarding successful entrepreneurship in order to bolster the business climate of the island.

It’s clear that the time for change is upon us. Change isn’t always popular, nor fun or easy. But it is necessary. This province will continue to be a crucial part of Canada and an even more important player in an increasingly globalized world.

We’re currently taking steps in the right direction, with grassroot startups making their debut across the province. East Coast Lifestyle serves as the paradigm in the quest for Nova Scotian entrepreneurs. We’ve proven that we can do it. All of the necessary tools for growth and expansion are in front of us and the roadmap is there.

I believe in Nova Scotia.

You should too.

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SRC Decoded: What You Missed April 10th http://theath.ca/news/src-decoded-missed-april-10th/ http://theath.ca/news/src-decoded-missed-april-10th/#respond Tue, 10 Apr 2018 17:52:18 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4187 Every week, your elected student government meets on a Tuesday night to talk about issues concerning the ASU. Agenda items can seem long, mysterious and confusing without the proper background, making it difficult to see how these issues affect students. Here’s what happened at the last meeting on April 10th: New Council This was the first... Read more »

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Every week, your elected student government meets on a Tuesday night to talk about issues concerning the ASU. Agenda items can seem long, mysterious and confusing without the proper background, making it difficult to see how these issues affect students. Here’s what happened at the last meeting on April 10th:

New Council

This was the first meeting of the 2018-19 SRC. Power was delegated by the previous Council to ensure the first meeting was legitimate and that their authority holds for the summer meeting, as the Executive Board has authority until the first day of the Academic Year.

Executive Goal Documents

Council Members adopted the goal documents of the Executive Board, comprised of the President, VP Finance & Operations, VP Student Life, VP Events & Promotions, and VP Academic & External. The goal document of the Chairperson was also adopted, emphasizing the ongoing ASU Bylaw revision as an important goal for the upcoming year.

Committee Appointments

Council entertained appointments to standing committees. These committees include:

  • Presidential Affairs Committee: Tasked with handling issues pertaining to the Office of the President but meets rarely
  • Events & Promotions Committee: Tasked to develop communication and promotion strategies over the year, including events like SuperSUB and Frost Week
  • Academic Affairs Committee: Tasked with dealing with issues pertaining to the University and student life, including representation on the University Senate and running events like the Propylaeum Cup. This is a very active committee
  • Student Life Committee: Deals with clubs, internal organizations, and general student affairs as chaired by the VP Student Life
  • Financial Affairs Committee: Proposes the annual budget to Council and deals with other financial matters
  • Campus Representation Committee: Ensures representation pertinent to diversity on campus
  • House Presidents Committee: Composed of all House Presidents and the VP Student Life to discuss residence affairs
  • Governance Committee: Tasked with ensuring that the ASU functions well. This is an active committee because of the persistent revisions to the ASU Constitution and bylaws
  • Review Board: The only ASU Committee that has legal power. This committee deals with Council honoraria and payments to other ASU employees
  • Student Funding Committee: Deals with approving transactions from the Student Activities Fund and Wellness Fund
  • Environmental Sustainability Committee: Chaired by the Sustainability Officer and works with other environmentally inclined clubs and organizations on campus to promote sustainable practices
  • Hiring Committee: Hires Union employees and members within the Office of the Chairperson
  • SUB Renewal Committee: The most recent Standing Committee tasked with ensuring the process for redeveloping the Student Union Building stays on track

 

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The Good, The Bad, and the Non-Compliant http://theath.ca/features/good-bad-non-compliant/ http://theath.ca/features/good-bad-non-compliant/#respond Tue, 10 Apr 2018 17:23:54 +0000 http://theath.ca/?p=4189 The Valley is filled with a bevy of restaurants from which Acadia students are privileged to choose. Picasso’s, Lib Pub, Sushi Fang, The Naked Crepe, and many more well-attended establishments. The wider Annapolis Valley area is without a doubt a fantastic place to eat. I’m sure that nearly everyone that attends Acadia has had at... Read more »

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The Valley is filled with a bevy of restaurants from which Acadia students are privileged to choose. Picasso’s, Lib Pub, Sushi Fang, The Naked Crepe, and many more well-attended establishments. The wider Annapolis Valley area is without a doubt a fantastic place to eat. I’m sure that nearly everyone that attends Acadia has had at least a few delicious meals at one of the previously mentioned restaurants. Sitting in my living room, reminiscing with h friends about Wheelock Dining Hall and our days in residence, we began to talk about how dirty some people claim meal hall is.  Instantly I was curious and began my standard Google-based investigation. I started by asking myself if I thought there were food safety or health code violations at Wheelock. If there were, how could they be verified? This led me to a larger issue. Are there health code compliance issues with the popular restaurants in town? Again, where would I be able to find this information? As always, Google had my back. Entering the phrase, “Nova Scotia Health Inspector” directed me to public health inspection records.

The Province of Nova Scotia Health Inspector’s website provides a form from which you can instantly request the electronic inspection records for any establishment in the province for the last decade. All you have to do is input some basic information like the name of the establishment, the address, and the period for which you would like to see records. I decided to examine some of the most popular destinations for students both in Wolfville and in the surrounding area.

They include:

  • Pronto Pizza
  • Picasso’s Pizza
  • Paddy’s Brew Pub
  • The Naked Crepe
  • Troy’s Mediterranean Restaurant
  • Library Pub
  • La Torta Woodfired Pizzeria
  • Sushi Fang
  • Wheelock Dining Hall (Operated by our friends at Chartwell’s)
  • Subway

In order to get a better picture of historic compliance issues I examined the Nova Scotia Food Establishment Inspection Reports for these establishments from January 1, 2008 through April 5, 2018. Records are removed from the online database after more than three years so the records I have access to are no older than that. How do the various student-frequented establishments stack up when compared to one another? As is the case of a few of these establishments, I feel it is necessary to get specific with what health inspectors revealed during their unannounced examination of these eateries. All health code violations are up to the interpretation of health inspectors. Not all violations represent a serious risk to health, however, it is worth noting that based on the documents I have examined, all of the restaurants do have some violations. I should reiterate, not all violations are serious. The definition of a “Deficiency” under the provincial health codes according to the Nova Scotia Provincial government is “Requirement(s) of the Regulations or Code not being achieved by the food establishment. The word deficiency is often used interchangeably with the words violation, or infraction.” Let’s see what the restaurants of Wolfville have crawling in their back rooms.

Pronto Pizza is one of Wolfville’s establishments frequented by weekend warriors and is also one of the most concerning establishments. On June 5, 2015, the inspection lists no deficiencies. On December 3rd, 2015, the remarks include a failure to store potentially hazardous foods properly, cleaning required of all shelving, rear wooden counter, milk fridge and some shelving and surfaces in 2 door commercial fridge, washroom toilet fixtures, under and behind equipment some wall areas and all floors. Further, inadequate sanitation systems were observed. However, most concerning of all reported deficiencies is listed as, “FAILURE TO OBTAIN A VALID PERMIT PRIOR TO OPERATING A FOOD ESTABLISHMENT.” More than one year later on September 26th, 2016, The same deficiencies as December 3rd, 2015 reappeared but the permit issue was remedied.

Picasso’s Pizza makes a rad donair but during visits in October and December of 2017 the health inspector noted on both occasions that there was a “Failure to protect food from contamination” and the comments from the October inspection read, “Store chemicals separately from food & packaging. All food & packaging to be stored >6 in./15 cm. minimum off floor. Dry ingredients containers rusted and not acceptable for food contact.”

Next, we move to Paddy’s ,The Naked Crepe, and Troy’s Mediterranean Restaurant. All three of these businesses seem relatively well in order based on their inspection reports. Both Paddy’s and The Naked Crepe received no infractions on their most recent inspections.  In the case of Paddy’s there were consistent infractions during four inspections over two years for “failure to store potentially hazardous food at a temperature of four degrees celsius or less.” The Naked Crepe had only minor infractions revealed in their September 2017 inspection. Troy’s received notices to comply over inadequate hand washing stations in their most recent inspection that took place in February of this year.

Next we turn to the Lib Pub. There is nothing significant to report here other than excellent food and drink. It has been more than two years since their last inspection during which time some basic temperature monitoring devices were reported as not calibrated properly and a dishwasher that could use “Daily water temperature and chemical sanitizer concentration records.”

La Torta Woodfired Pizzeria, I’ve never personally eaten here nor have I heard positive or negative reviews related to the pizza place. Their inspection on April 4, 2018 revealed only minor deficiencies that weren’t related to food safety.

Unfortunately the previous records of relative excellence or acceptability end here. Sushi Fang is without a doubt the worst example of food safety I was able to find. There are some direct quotes from their report that are worth sharing. All inspections took place between July 2015 and February 2018. There were regular violations indicated that suggest Sushi Fang’s operator does not adequately train their staff in safe food handling. Some noteworthy observations from the February 2018 inspection, “Food handler certification of the owner has expired” and, “Raw foods must be kept separate and always stored below ready to eat foods (corrected). All utensils and work surfaces must be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition (corrected). Foods must be stored a minimum of 15 cm (6in.) off of the floor (corrected). Foods when returned to storage must be labelled and dated to ensure proper stock rotation. Fresh raw seafood intended to be consumed raw must be dated and ensure frozen >= 7 days at -20C to ensure parasite destruction.” Or, my personal favourite, “Vermin-proof /seal small opening in building.” This restaurant has some ridiculous violations that would indicate food safety is a serious problem there.

Of course, we have to check out Wheelock Dining Hall operated by our friends at Chartwell’s. During their inspections between the February 24, 2016, and  December 18, 2017, there were eleven deficiencies noted with nine notices to comply issued. Some of the issues did have to do with food safety and “failure to protect food from contamination” the notes from the inspector indicate lack of sneeze guards and uncovered food being left out for long periods of time.

Subway has some pretty decent sandwiches but their record is rough. Over seven inspections in the last three years there were nine total deficiencies with nine notices to comply issued. The comments “The operator has failed to ensure the food handlers have the necessary training” appears five times over two years.

With all that being said, it seems these health codes are in some cases too specific. They capture issues that are not related to food safety. For example some of these establishments were issued deficiencies based on “lighting intensity” or the lack of a schedule to maintain their dishwashers. On the whole, the restaurants I’ve examined here are probably ok to eat at. The fact is, you should always use your best judgment when eating out. For example, eating sushi in the Annapolis Valley is probably already a risky activity.

 

I would encourage my readers to verify the validity of this article by visiting: (https://novascotia.ca/agri/foodsafety/reports/Request.aspx).

 

Disagree with me? Write for the Ath.

 

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